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Three Ways to Style Your Hair without Heat

September 5th, 2014

hair dryerExcessive blow-drying, ironing or curling may look nice, but it’s ultra-damaging to your hair. There are ways to achieve chic hair styles that will leave you confident and beautiful without the heat. Learn to create beach waves, a braided bun up-do and Farrah Fawcett’s signature voluminous hair in a few simple steps. See below!

No Heat Beach Waves

Want to look like you just stepped off of St. Tropez without the cost of the plane ticket? Now you can get beach waves with only three things- water, your hands, and small clips.

1) Start by separating your hair down the middle for a perfect part.

2) Take each part of hair, wet it, and twist it super tight.

3) Then, take the twisted piece of hair and bring it horizontally across the part, securing it to the opposite side of hair with your small clip.

4) Repeat this for the opposite side and leave on for about an hour.

5) After the time is up, unravel the twists and voila- beach waves without the mess of actually going to the beach.

The Farrah Fawcett

Everyone knows Farah Fawcett for her luxurious blonde curls. Most of the time, people use blow driers to gain the voluminous look that Farah made so iconic. Now, you can get the same beautiful curls without the heat.

1) First, wet your hair completely.

2) Then, towel dry your locks so they are still a little damp.

3) Next, section off your damp hair into twisted curls while pinning them all across your head.

4) Sleep the night away and release your tight curls the next morning.

5) Your hair will have dried into luscious curls that have body, shine, and luster.

Upside Down Bun Braid

Who says buns have to be boring? Now, you can add a fun braid into the mix in a few simple steps.

1) First, separate the lower layer of your hair from the top layer. This will help separate the bun from the braid.

2) Second, bend your head over and grab the lower layer of hair.

3) Begin to braid the hair upwards toward the top of your head. Secure the braid with a hair tie.

4) Then, take the upper layer of hair that was previously tied and join it with the braid.

5) Secure the bun with another hair tie and you’re good to go!

Myths About Hair Growth

August 1st, 2014

Trimming HairEarlier we made a blog post about the biggest myths about hair loss. That got us thinking…what are the myths about hair growth? Surely there are some. Have you heard the one about how standing on your head will make your hair grow faster? That would be funny to see. So, we decided to see what we could find, and you may be surprised at what we learned.

Trimming Your Hair Will Make it Grow Faster

Wrong! Trimming your hair won’t make it grow faster, that’s just silly. Hair is decaying flesh, cutting off the decay isn’t going to make a difference. The only thing trimming your hair is good for is keeping it healthy and maintaining appearances.

You Need to Change Your Shampoos Often

People adapt, it’s true. If you go to the gym and start working out, you’re going to be sore for the next few days. After a few weeks, you’re used to it. The same isn’t true for your hair though. Using the same shampoos over and over will continue to treat your hair the way they’re designed to. The only time you will need to change your shampoo is if your hair has recently been damaged and requires moisture.

Cold Water Makes Your Hair Shiny

You can’t really believe that can you? Your hair is dead, remember? You can’t make it shine with cold water. The only way to improve your hair is to directly treat the hair follicles and the scalp. However, you can damage your hair with high heat, such as blow drying often, straighteners, and constant hair coloring treatments.

100 Brushes a Day

No, brushing your hair often will not cause it to grow faster. It won’t stimulate your scalp and hair follicles, and give them a wakeup call. If anything, constant brushing of the hair can lead to damage, especially if you’re using a brush with harsh or sharp bristles. It is good to brush your hair before you sleep, to get rid of tangles and knots, but don’t force it. If you get stuck, use your fingers to work through this mess, or you’ll risk some wear and tear.

Shampoo Less Often for Less Oily Hair

This myth doesn’t make any sense. One of the main reasons people shampoo is to clean their hair and scalp. If you shampoo less, your hair and scalp is bound to get oilier. You can’t change your genetics with shampoo, so shampooing less will not stop oil production from the scalp. Have you ever gone without a shower for several days? By the 3rd or 5th day, your hair can be so oily, you can style it as if you were using hair gel.

Don’t Go Plucking Grey Hairs

Human hair starts to grey mostly due to genetics. Like a clock alarm going off, sooner or later our hair pigment starts to fade and we go grey. Plucking a grey hair to get rid of it because it’s “unsightly” isn’t going to cause more to spring up. However, plucking hairs irritates the follicle and those surrounding it, which can lead to unhealthy hair growth.

You Can Fix Split Ends

Oh how shampoo commercials love to pull this one. Nothing, and we mean nothing can fix a split end. No product, no tool, except for maybe glue, will fuse split ends back together. Once a hair splits, it’s a goner. The only way to fix a split end is to cut it off.

Stress Causes Grey Hair

This is actually a myth we all like. It’s funny to think someone could get so scared that their hair turns grey. That isn’t true. However, stress can have a physiological effect on the human body and mind. It is believed stress raises hydrogen peroxide levels in the hair follicles which leads to bleaching of the hair. We’re not sure how true that is, but either way, grey hairs still come down to genetics.

Comb Your Hair from Top to Bottom

This makes logical sense right? Start near the roots and work your way down. This isn’t a good idea though. Think of it like trying to undo a knot at its base—Impossible. The best way to undo a knot is to pull on the ends of it. Same thing with your hair. Start brushing from the ends and work your way up. This way, you will avoid breakage (especially if it’s wet), and you won’t put so much strain on your hair. If your hair is tangled or knotty, brushing your hair from the bottom up will fix them easier.

Hair Texture is the Same Forever

This one is such bull. The hair may be dead, but it isn’t stone. Many things can change the texture of your hair, such as medication, disease, hormones, etc. Hair styling treatments can also do a number on hair. Ever see someone who was naturally curly go through a couple of hair straightening treatments? Even when the treatment fades, their hair isn’t as curly as it was before.

Were you surprised to find out some of these favorite myths weren’t true? Let us know in the comments below!

Hair across the Ages

July 25th, 2014

Greek Hair WomanPeople have had hair since the dawn of time, since the era of cavemen, once we evolved and learned to walk. Human hair has been through a lot over the years, and it hasn’t been the same since. Take a look at everything we go through just to fix a bad hair day in these modern times; all the styling, the waxes and machinery, and of course we hit the salon now and then to spruce it up a bit. What did they do back in the day, once humans survived the first couple hundred (or thousand) years? Let’s take a look.

Egypt

Back in the days of Egypt, the most common hair color was a very dark brown or black, and the hair itself was usually curly. Any type of old art, or even modern images of Egyptians will make that clear. Their hairstyles back then mainly depended on age, not gender. Children, from birth until they hit puberty, were clean shaven and generally kept bald. Once they hit puberty, they were given a choice to let it grow to shoulder-length or to the nape of the neck.

In the later years, when age starts to weigh down on the body, one tends to lose their hair. To keep up appearances, henna was used to dye greying hair. If one was losing their hair, they made wigs out of real hair and/or black sheep wool. They also designed false braids and hair extensions to increase their own beauty/appearance, a common practice still found today. When Egyptians came into contact with the Greek, their hairstyles started to mix a bit, lending themselves to short and wavy hair, and the addition of wearing bands in one’s hair—possibly the first type of hair scrunchy made.

They say the Egyptians were ahead of their time, and when it came to hair treatment, they were definitely ahead of the pack. Here are a few of the things we may have picked up from them:

–Washing and cleaning hair and/or wigs – A mix of water and citric juices; the citric acid would dissolve fatty oils, leaving hair smooth and shiny. They also used almond oil as a hair conditioner.

–Hair removal or shaving – Sharpened blades made of copper or bronze

–Coloring or dying hair – As mentioned, they made use of henna to dye hair. The henna was usually a hue of orange or red, but the Egyptians would mix it with cow’s blood and crushed tadpoles for different variations of color.

–Early hair gel – Following some grooming and manually setting up their hair for the style they wanted, they would put beeswax in their hair and then sit out in the sun until it hardened.

–How to strengthen hair – Egyptians used different types of oils (almond, rosemary, or castor oil) in their hair to stimulate hair growth and to make it stronger.

Ancient Hebrews

Like the Egyptians, early Hebrews also had mainly dark or black hair that was usually very curly. They wore it long, mainly because they were forbidden to shave their heads or face in honor of the Gods; the only exceptions were in a time of mourning, or if they had their head shaved as a punishment for sinning. This is because baldness was believed to be a curse back then, so the longer someone’s hair was, the more it was esteemed or cherished. Not much has changed since then, wouldn’t you say (cue rock star head banging)?

To give their hair some shine, early Hebrews would powder their hair with golden dust. They also used oils for a variety of uses—possibly the oddest one was spilling perfumed oils onto visitors as a sign of welcome. That doesn’t sound like the best idea in the hot sun; thankfully the Hawaiians figured out a good ol’ fashioned lay was a bit more welcoming. Later, Hebrews got mixed in with Central Europe, North Africa, and Spain. This led to Hebrews with different hair colors, such as brown, blonde, and red.

Greece

Greeks were known worldwide for their hairstyles. The Greeks actually revolutionized a lot of things, sex being one of them. Their hairstyles resembled the ever-changing world, so it was mostly styled with waves or loose curls to symbolize impermanence. Greek hairstyles were mostly based on gender and social status. Slaves had their heads shaved, whilst those of higher class had elaborated hairstyles, and put dressings in their hair. Men tended to have naturally wavy hair on their heads and in their beards, whilst women had long, shoulder-length hair, or past the back. Interestingly enough, women wore their hair in long braids to signify they were married.

It wasn’t until later that the Greeks started to tamper with their hair, artificially curling or straightening it. They had a variety of hairstyles to choose from once they started experimenting:

–Worn with braids, and/or bangs
–“Melon hairstyle” where the hair is pulled back and set with a pin, tied into a bun at the back of the head. Sometimes, women tied their hair with tiaras or other jeweled crowns.
–“The Bartlett Head” – Hair tied in two knots atop the head
–Men’s hair was still wavy, but they were no longer unkempt. Some men started to curl their hair at this time.

Back in the day, being a barber was an important profession in Ancient Greece. Taking care of other people’s hair was a big deal. Then, these barbershops eventually turned into the first ever “Man-Caves”, where men would gather around and commune. The Greeks also invented some fascinating uses for oils and plants for hair treatment:

–Perfumes – Made of flowers, spices, and olive oil blends. These were applied to the body as well as the hair.
–Softening hair – They mainly made use of brushes and scalp massages to make their hair soft
–Hair dye – Gold was at one point very desirable (as was the usual illustration for the hair of the Gods), and could be achieved by mixing saffron flowers and potassium water to make the dye.

Rome

Rome had some similarities with Greece, as the pattern goes. Their hairstyles varied more depending on the time of the age and society. Throughout the different empires and rulers of Rome, Romans constantly went from keeping their heads and face shaved to letting it grow out. At first, men had long hair and beards until Greek influence brought the clean shaven look, along with a type of bowl cut. As noted, this only lasted as long as the empire did. Baldness wasn’t seen as a curse, but viewed as less physically appealing/attractive.

Later, it was common to see men with long hair and beards in braids and ponytails. Those of high social status in Rome had complex and sophisticated styles, usually tended to by servants. Those of low status had simple styles, typically kept short. Many curled their hair with a heated, hollow, iron tube—sound familiar? Wigs were also worn to augment the look and size of one’s hair, much like hair extensions. Wigs in Rome were also made with human hair, and oddly enough, blonde hair came from German slaves and black hair came from India.

Romans also discovered hair dying, done with henna. To achieve different colors, they mixed herbs/flowers together; herbs for red, saffron flowers for gold. Black hair was made with rotten leeches mixed with red wine for a little over a month, and then dousing the head/hair with the solution. Bleached hair could be achieved by washing it with potassium water and hydrogen peroxide.

Barbershops were also a popular place in Rome, specifically for men to commune. Although the hairstyles changed throughout the time, primarily for men, women had a little more variety. They had three main hairstyles to choose from:

–Tutulus – This was a maternal hairstyle, or a style worn by the mother in a family. The hair was sectioned and shaped into a bun. They tied it with fillets of wool, and the end result would be hair that was conical in shape.
–Nodus – The hair was parted into three sections; the hair at the sides was tied to the back in a bun, whereas the middle section was tied in a knot at the top of the head.
–Sine Crine – Six locks of hair, independently braided, usually worn by brides and virgins

Hairstyles and hair treatment have evolved a lot since then. We’ve also improved upon a lot of what humans did back in the day. Other things, such as attitudes towards hair or a lack thereof, have changed as well, and change is usually a good thing.

Stimulating Hair Growth

July 22nd, 2014

Stimulating Hair Growth

When people start to lose their hair, many of them react in different ways. Some of us just ignore it, and let Mother Nature get to work. Others tend to panic and look for ways to stop hair loss before it gets worse. These days, many of us would prefer to keep our hair for as long as possible, and there are a few things we can do to accomplish this task. What it all boils down to is how you treat your hair, and what you put in your body.

External

Physical activity is a great way to keep your body healthy, and surprisingly enough, it can also benefit your hair. There are a few things you can do to help keep your hair healthy, and to promote hair growth, that don’t require a lot of physical labor. Plus, there are a few things you may want to avoid when looking for hair loss treatments.

Physical Exercise – This activity is almost a given. Everyone benefits from a little physical exercise, be it going for a jog or pumping iron. A little known secret about keeping your hair growing and healthy is blood circulation in the scalp, and what does exercise do? It gets your blood pumping all over the body! If your main focus is blood circulation of the scalp, read on.

Manually stimulate your scalp – Aside from blood circulation being increased via exercise, stimulating your scalp doesn’t require you to break a sweat. Basically, give yourself a nice little deep-tissue head massage. Be sure to focus on the areas around the hair line and the crown, as those are usually the first places to go. If you really want to jazz it up, some people suggest using a few drops of olive oil with your scalp massage, and then really working it in there. Just don’t be too aggressive, or you could up root your hair follicles. If you use olive oil, you may want to stay indoors for a while—things could get a little messy.

Avoid styling your hair too often – Yes, we all love to get dolled up. Who hasn’t straightened their hair “just to see how it looks”? Put your hand down, we all have. However, doing this a lot will cause some major hair damage with all that heat application. Not to mention using gooey gels and smelly sprays to obtain that cool hairdo. The myth about your hair needing to breathe has been debunked, but you’re still introducing a lot of foreign chemicals to your hair and scalp.

Shampoo – Keeping your hair clean is of course necessary for having healthy hair. However, not all shampoos are free of harmful chemicals. Many of them contain ingredients like sulfates and paraben that damage hair. If you want to promote hair growth, and keep your scalp healthy, look into shampoos made with saw palmetto extract and natural oils such as emu and jojoba.

Internal

It may not surprise you that what you put in your body has an effect on it. After all, the body absorbs whatever it can in terms of nutrients from everything you eat. Once metabolized and stored, these nutrients will directly affect everything from your immune system to your hair. So, if you are thinking of trying out a new diet, or wondering what to eat to stimulate hair growth, we have a few suggestions for you to try.

Vitamins – Many of us don’t get enough vitamins, and although not overly detrimental to one’s health, not enough vitamins will give us a lack of nutrients, and a lack of nutrients can cause a lack of hair.

Vitamin C – Found in citrus fruits like oranges and lemons, vitamin C is necessary for healthy hair. Increasing your intake of vitamin C will help your body absorb iron, a nutrient essential for increasing hair growth and reducing hair loss. In addition, vitamin c helps to build up collagen, a major structural protein that surrounds hair follicles, keeping them strong and healthy.

Vitamin B – The B vitamin group does a lot more than play a role in cell metabolism. Blood circulation is a large part of hair loss; we need something to keep the cells in the scalp active. Vitamin B3 is widely known for its promotion of blood circulation in the scalp to prevent hair loss. Moreover, a vitamin like B6 can help stop the conversion of testosterone to DHT, a hormone that causes major hair loss.

Hormones – Oh boy, do these cause some problems, and more than just feeling all “icky” in our teen years. An imbalance of hormones can be a huge factor of hair loss for men and women. Hormones influence hair growth, and their production slows down as we age. However, there are a few things we can do to take care of that.

Increase your intake – It’s a common act for men and women to ingest hormone supplements for a variety of reasons. One of these is hair loss. For women, many of them take prenatal vitamins when expecting, and some increase their estrogen during menopause to balance things out. However, if you’re a lady, and not a fan of vitamins, you can eat some wild yam or have a soy protein shake.

Reduce DHT – Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is a major culprit of hair loss in men and women. Over time, the body converts testosterone into DHT, and this abundance tends to build up around hair follicles, ultimately suffocating them. Your best bet is to either take some DHT blockers, or use some shampoo that inhibits DHT absorption in the skin.

Liquids – We all need to drink liquids to keep our body lubricated and functioning. Water makes up about 60% of water in the body, so it’s clearly a big factor in keeping healthy. The suggested amount of water is 4-8 cups a day to keep regularly hydrated, more if you like salty snacks. If you like to have an occasional alcoholic beverage, you definitely want to increase your water intake to avoid a hangover. Additionally, alcohol increases body fat and hair loss in tiny ways that are unnoticeable until it becomes a problem.

These are just a few of the ways you can stimulate hair growth and avoid major hair loss. We will always reap what we sow, whether we do something to our hair or put something in it. The best thing you can do is keep your scalp stimulated and clean, and keep an eye on what you eat and drink. Just remember that hair loss isn’t the end of the world, but you can promote hair growth by treating your hair right.

Hairstyling Tips for Men with Thinning Hair

July 3rd, 2014

Fashion portrait of young man in black shirtHair loss can affect people of all ages for a number of different reasons, while you may be using hair loss shampoos and treatments to regrow your hair, we all know it doesn’t happen overnight.  So while your hair is in the process of re-growing, chances are you will still have to deal with the look of thin or thinning hair.  Luckily there are some hairstyling tips that can help reduce the appearance of thinning hair and instead give it a fuller look. Check out some of these hairstyling tips for men with thinning hair.

The Shorter the Better

Don’t overlook the value of a good haircut.  Whether your hair loss is very noticeable or it is simply losing some of its lust, don’t be afraid to go shorter.  Shorter hair actually makes the hair look and feel thicker and fuller.  Once you decide to switch to a shorter haircut you want to make sure that your hair dresser makes clean, blunt lines and doesn’t cut the hair with a razor, as this thins out the ends of the hair. If you are just starting to notice hair thinning, you may not necessarily need to switch to a shorter “do” right away but instead try a shaggy or slick back look.  Regardless of your hair type, eliminating dead, scraggly limp hair, eliminates excess weight and is usually the way to go.

Use the Right Products

As you are discovering ways to make your hair look thicker, always use methods like hair loss shampoos with beneficial ingredients like ketoconazole to help tackle hair loss from the root.  In addition to hair loss shampoos and other topical treatment, make sure to use the right styling products for your hair.  Contrary to popular belief, gels and other similar styling products do not cause hair loss.  However, being too rough with the hair can lead to breakage.  A common mistake among many men is either using a styling product that is too thick or heavy, or simply just using too much a particular product.  Many styling products can weigh down the hair and can also cause separation, revealing more of the scalp. Your goal is to add structure and the appearance of thickness to the hair.  So when it comes to styling product, more times than not, less is more. Also, avoid shiny pomades and gels as this further enhances the appearance of hair loss and hair thinning.

Style Your Hair

Styling rule #1: NEVER execute a comb over.  For those who are unaware, a comb over is when the hair on the back or on the sides are left to grow out.  These longer hairs are then combed over the balding area and held in place with an overly generous amount of styling product.  This hairstyle doesn’t fool anyone because it typically doesn’t decrease the appearance of hair loss but instead makes it more noticeable.

Depending on your hair, another thing you may want to avoid are parts.  Adding parts to your hair allows the scalp to become visible increasing appearance of hair loss or thinning hair.  If you find that your hair is thinning in multiple areas, keep it short and use your fingertips to apply a lightweight product to add texture.  As previously mentioned, if you are in the beginning stages of hair loss and don’t wish to cut your hair short just yet, a slick back look is always a classic choice.  This doesn’t mean you have to go crazy with product and you certainly don’t want your hair to be shinning from miles away.  For this look try a water-based pomade.

3 Protective Hairstyles for Healthier Hair

June 13th, 2014

Many hairstyles that are frequently use can be harmful for our hair causing severe damage. From overheating to tension on your strands, using hot irons, tight hair ties, and lots of harsh hair product will be detrimental to you hair’s health in the long run. We’ve created a list of 3 easy hairstyles you can try without harming your hair.

via pinterest

via Pinterest

The Side Braid:

Many hairstyles that are frequently use can be harmful for our hair causing severe damage. From overheating to tension on your strands, using hot irons, tight hair ties, and lots of harsh hair product will be detrimental to you hair’s health in the long run. We’ve created a list of 3 easy hairstyles you can try without harming your hair.

Here’s how you achieve this look:

1) part you hair to the desired side.

2) Begin braiding your hair from the parted area

3) Carry the braid down to the ends of hair

4) Secure loosely with a rubber band, hair tie, or ribbon.

(For fishtails, start the top portion as a regular braid, then switch to fishtail at the ends.

via Pinterest

via Pinterest

The Beach Waves:

Everyone is envious of those perfect “beach waves” seen on celebrities, but sometimes it takes several hours with a curling wand or iron and an excess of hair spray. You can achieve this look by using natural salt water and twisting or braiding hair over night. It a protective solution to your yearning for a curly hair style.

Here’s how you do it:

1) Separate hair into at least five sections.

2) Create a combination of sea salt, water and a cream gel. (Be sure to choose one that is alcohol free to prevent damage.)

3) Put combination into a spray bottle.

4) Lightly Spray solution on each section of hair.

5) Braid or twist each section individually and secure the ends with a rubber band.

6) Sleep on it overnight.

7) In the morning, carefully remove hairbands and loosen braids. Style with fingers.

via Pinterest

via Pinterest

The Braided Bun:

Braided buns are not only a fun twist on a updo its also better than a tight ponytail. The braids allow you to secure you hair with a few bobby pins instead of tight hair ties.

How to get this look:

1) Separate hair into two parts. (One towards the top and the other at the bottom.)

2) Braid both parts.

3) Twist into a desired bun.

4) Secure with bobby pins.

5) Use a soft styling cream to tame fly away strands. (It is healthier than hair spray.)

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